Search:

On Self-Tracking

May 18th, 2011

I have said it and repeated it numerous times, UCIAD is profoundly different from all the other JISC Activity data projects at many different levels. One of them, at the basis of our main hypothesis is that we consider activity data for the user’s own consumption, and to his/her own benefit. The team working in UCIAD has made this notion of user-centric personal information a guiding principle for research. With my colleague Matthew Rowe we recently described a major aspect of this research in a position paper for the W3C Workshop on Web Tracking and User Privacy: Self-tracking on the Web.

As described in the paper, entitled “Self-Tracking on the Web: Why and How“, self-tracking is “the activity of monitoring and analysing one’s own behaviour regarding personal information exchange and the consequences of such behaviour on their exposure, privacy and reputation“. We emphasize in this paper how existing tools and technologies to realise self-tracking on the Web are limited, especially in comparison with the tools and technologies used to track user activities and data to the benefit of organisations. The paper concluded that “achieving such a process of self-tracking can be very revealing to Web users, helping them reaching a better awareness of their own online behaviour, and a better understanding of the possible consequences of such behaviour on the exposure of their personal information. Such an approach appears to be crucially needed as the Web evolves to both a global information marketplace, and a major medium for all sorts of social interactions online. [...] We therefore argue that a more principled and comprehensive study of the activity of self-tracking on the Web and of the technological requirements for such an activity to take place should be conducted. This requires for both the social and conceptual models of the way personal information is exchanged on the Web to be related to the technological protocols that are used as mediums for instantiating these models. From a more concrete point of view, we believe that a new set of tools are to be created that will support users in monitoring their own activity on the Web

UCIAD can be seen as an experiment in this direction. Focusing on Web data related to the interaction between an user and an organisation, it is looking at the techniques, the models and the tools that are necessary to enable users to have a personalised view on their own data, i.e., the data generated by their own activity. More generally, it is also setting up generic models of activity online i.e., the ontologies and the associated technological components, that can be reused in broader environments.

Leave a Reply