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Final post – Putting things together (with a demo)

August 5th, 2011

Over the last 6 months we have been working on building the UCIAD platform, experimenting with large-scale activity data, reflecting on user-centric data and blogging our thoughts. While, as can be seen from the last few posts on this blog, there is quite some work we think should follow from this, it is nice to see things finally coming together, and to be able to show a bit of the UCIAD platform with have been talking about for some times. What better way to do this than with a video of the running platform, showing the different components in action. (Note: it is better to watch it in 720p – HD).

This video shows a user (me) registering to the UCIAD platform with some setting details and browsing his activity data as they appear on several Open University websites (mostly, an internal wiki system and the Open University’s linked data platform – data.open.ac.uk). This video therefore integrates in a working demo the different components we have been talking about here:

  • User management: As we can see here, as the user registers into the UCIAD platform, his current setting is automatically detected, and other settings (other browsers) that are likely to be his are also included. As the user registers, the settings are associated to his account and the activity data realised through these settings are extracted.
  • Extracting user-centric activity data: As described in the first part of the blog post on reasoning (previous link), the settings associated with the user are used to extract the activity data around this particular user, creating a sub-graph corresponding to his activity.
  • Ontologies to make sense of activity data: The ontologies are used in structuring the data according to a common schema and to provide a base to homogeneously query data coming from different systems. As discussed below, they can also be extended (specified) so that different categories of activities and resources can be represented, and reasoned upon.
  • Ontological reasoning for analysis: What the demo video shows clearly is how the activity data is organised according to different categories (traces, webpages, websites, settings, etc.) coming from the base ontologies, but also according to classes of activities, resources, etc. that have been specially added to cover the websites and the particular user in this case. Here, we extended the ontology in order to include definitions of activities relevant to the use of a wiki and a data platform. The powerful aspect of using ontologies here is that such classes can be added to the ontology for the system to automatically process them and organise the data according to them. Here, for example, we define “Executing a SPARQL Query” as an activity that takes place on a SPARQL endpoint with a “query” parameter, or “Checking Wiki Updates” as an activity on a Wiki page that is realised through an RSS client.
  • Browsing data according to ontologies: We haven’t described this components yet, but we rely on an homemade “browser” that we use in a number of projects and that can inspect ontology classes and members of these classes, generating graphs and simple stats.

Next steps

There are a lot of things to mention here, some of them we have already mentioned several times. An obvious one is the finalisation, distribution and deployment of the UCIAD platform. A particular element we want to get done at a short term is to investigate the use of the UCIAD platform with various users, to see what kind of extensions of the ontologies would be commonly useful, and generally to get some insight into the reaction of users when being exposed to their own data.

More generally, we think that there is a lot more work to do on both the aspects of user-centric activity data and on the use of ontologies for the analysis of such data, as described in particular in our Wins and Fails post. These includes aspects around the licensing, distribution and generally management of user-centric data (as mentioned in our post on licensing). Indeed, while “giving back data to the users” is already technically difficult, there is a lot of fuzziness currently around the issues of ownership of activity data. This also forces us to look a lot more carefully at the privacy challenges that such data can generate, that didn’t exist when these data were held and stayed on server logs.

Beyond UCIAD and the Open University

As discussed in our post on the benefits of UCIAD, the issues considered go largely beyond the Open University and even activity data. The issues around licensing in particular are to be considered more broadly, in the same way as the challenges around communicating on user-centric data.

We have been focusing mostly on the technical issues in UCIAD, providing in this way a base framework to start investigating these broader and more complex challenges.

Most significant lessons

To put it simply, the most significant lessons we learnt (as mentioned in the wins and fails post) are:

  • Both user-centric data and ontologies are complex notions, so don’t assume they are understood.
  • Activity data are massive and complex, beyond what can be handled by current semantic data infrastructures, without a bit of clever management.
  • There is a lot of potential in using ontologies and ontological engineering for the analysis and interpretation of raw data.

One Response to “Final post – Putting things together (with a demo)”

  1. UCIAD » Blog Archive » Personal Activity Data: Another Project Says:

    [...] result is of course not dissimilar to the video produced at the end of phase 1 of UCIAD, and clearly, the user-study we are currently setting-up for phase 2 will provide valuable results [...]

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